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Posts Tagged ‘Lydia Wayman’

Top Ten: Things I Wish You Would Accept, No Questions Asked

October 25, 2011 4 comments

To kick off this new guest post series I am incredibly grateful to Lydia Wayman for her touching and insightful contribution. I would actually love to just cut and paste many of her posts onto my own website, but instead I will encourage you to visit her fantastic blog, Autistic Speaks.

Lydia is a 23-year-old author, speaker, blogger, and advocate from Pittsburgh, PA.  She also has autism.  When she’s not writing, Lydia enjoys reading, sewing and knitting, swimming, and above all, her mom and her cat.

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Top Ten Things That I Wish You Would Accept, No Questions Asked:

1. I can be surprisingly good at one thing (say, remembering conversations precisely as they happened many years after the fact) and surprisingly bad at another thing that you might think should be so much easier (like keeping track of receipts or remembering the procedure for filling a prescription).

2. Just because I have the words to type it does not mean that I have the words to say it.

3. I really do hate to melt down, especially in public. If there were another way out, I would always take it.

4. I never play stupid. If I ask a question or say I don’t get it, it means I don’t get it. Please don’t make me feel dumber by saying that I’m faking it, just because it seems straightforward.

5. What may be slightly bothersome to you, like the waistband on a pair of pants, can cause me to be a witch all day… or at least until I change clothes. If I’m crabby, it’s because something is physically uncomfortable in the sensory realm of things. Until that thing changes, I will continue to be crabby.

6. I can’t control my excitement over cats. So if you mention cats or point out a cat, realize that I’m going to get excited. Let me enjoy it. A little happiness never hurt anyone, eh?

7. I am often completely unaware of self-injurious behaviors. I scratch, hit, bite, and pick often, and much more frequently when I’m agitated for some reason. In the moment, I don’t know that I’m doing it; if made aware, it’s so compulsive that I almost physically can’t stop myself. But using my head, obviously I don’t like the results of it.

8. I am exactly the same person inside regardless of how engaged (or disengaged) I am with the environment and others in it. Yes, you might have to change some things based on how I’m reacting in that moment, but please continue to treat me like the same person that I am.

9. Engagement and happiness do not depend on one another! I can be just as happy off in my own world as I am fully engaged with you. However, a lot depends on you, here. If I’m disengaged and you’re forcing me to “act normal,” then no, I don’t feel very happy. If you’re interacting with me in a way that I can in that moment, then I can be as happy as I’ve ever been.

10. While autism does mean that I am absorbed within myself (aut means self, after all), that doesn’t mean that I don’t want you around. If you can come to me, rather than forcing me out of my world to come to you, then I’d love to let you in. There’s a whole world in here… maybe you should check it out.

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Like what you read? There is much more on Lydia’s blog – and, Lydia has written a book! Living in Technicolor: An autistic’s thoughts on raising a child with autism is a collection of pieces (poetry, blog posts, questions and answers, and recipes).  Her goal is to sell 150 copies in order to raise the money needed to bring her service dog home.  It’s available here and on Kindle here.

Autistic Speaks added to Websites and Resources

October 19, 2011 Leave a comment

Lydia Wayman, the speaker and writer I have been raving about (see the right sidebar for info on her upcoming event!) has a wonderful, inspiring blog. I can’t believe I didn’t add it to the Websites page sooner!

Check it out for yourself – http://autisticspeaks.wordpress.com/

 

And, please help me get her here this Spring (again, the right sidebar will explain everything)!

Want To Find Out What Your Special Needs Child Is Thinking? Here’s Your Chance!!

October 15, 2011 Leave a comment

I have lost count of the times I have thought to myself (or said aloud) “What are you thinking about?” or “What were you thinking?” or “What are you doing?!” or “Whywhywhywhywhy?” about something James has said or done (or not done). I have also blogged about the matter-of-fact, often firm-borderline-strict approach we have taken regarding behavior we consider to be disruptive, harmful or beyond unusual.

But oh, what I would give to know what is behind some of the behaviors, some of the strange things James says to other people, some of the things that upset James that we consider just plain crazy. If only he was able to explain to us the “why,” I feel like I could be a more patient, compassionate, empathetic mother and human being.

So I am beyond excited about the prospect that Lydia Wayman could be speaking at one of our meetings this Spring. Please help me make this incredible, unique event possible by purchasing tickets early and passing this information along to anyone who might be interested.

This could be a life changing experience for anyone who knows and cares about someone with ASDs, PDD, OCD, and Sensory Processing Disorders – what better perspective to gain than an insider perspective?

Pieces of Me: A Life on the Spectrum
Author and blogger Lydia Wayman will give a presentation based on her writings, including new book Living in Technicolor: An autistic’s thoughts on raising a child with autism.  She will bring you into the world of autism so that you can better help your child.  Lydia will take questions following the presentation.
Lydia Wayman is a 23-year-old author, speaker, blogger, and advocate from Pittsburgh, PA.  She also has autism.  When she’s not writing, Lydia enjoys reading, sewing and knitting, swimming, and above all, her mom and her cat.
Some sneak peeks at what Lydia has to say:
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This event is conditional on raising enough money to pay for the event. That’s where you come in. Regular tickets are $15, though discount tickets are available (enter any amount that is affordable to you). Please consider making a donation to help fund the cost of this presentation – there are some serious perks that come with a Premier or VIP ticket! All ticket proceeds go directly toward the cost of the event and Lydia’s travel expenses.

Click here for more details and to reserve tickets!