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Current Openings At The YAI: Unique Special Needs Programs and Services Around NYC

Since we recently moved to a new borough I thought it would be a good idea to see what special needs programs and services YAI  had in Brooklyn. I saw that there are a bunch of great openings and opportunities being offered all over NYC so I’ve posted the entire list, current as of 9/30/12:

Service Openings

Featured Program Openings 

Potential Residential Opening, Brooklyn ICF:  Potential opportunity for a male, age 21-55 years, who functions within severe/profound range, but who can evacuate two flights of stairs without physical assitance. Contact Tom Ott, 212-273-6462, for more information and to apply.

Potential Residential Opening, Bronx 24-Hour IRA: Potential opportunity for a female with mild/moderate intellectual disability. Contact Tom Ott, 212-273-6462, for more information and to apply.

Family Services

About YAI’s Family Services

YAI Autism Center: Offering private-pay programs including: Yoga with ballet or dance, social skills groups and music therapy. Call 1-888-YAI-AUTISM.

Manhattan Recreation Programs: Recreation programs for New York City residents over the age of 18, from Tuesdays through Saturdays. Weeknight group activities and Saturday trips. Transportation is not provided. Contact Pamela Accardo at 212-645-1616, ext. 618 or Edna Bay at 212-645-1616, ext. 620.

Project Intervene: Short-term intervention services for behavior management, toilet training, travel and other skills training are provided to individuals and their families in the home and/or group settings. Training programs are designed for parents of children with disabilities who reside in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Availability is based on where you live. Toilet training workshops are also available. Services provided in English and Spanish. For more information, call 212-273-6314 in Manhattan, and 212-273-6297 for Spanish. In Brooklyn, please call 718-306-1300, ext.411 for English and ext.412 for Spanish.

Family Reimbursement: Provides limited funds to families for services and goods that are not reimbursed through other programs or funding streams. For Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens residents. Contact Shanique Soto at 212-273-6585.

Manhattan Autism Social Skills Groups: Accepting applications for program teaching social skills to children aged 9-18 years old on the autism spectrum residing with their parents in Manhattan. Contact YAI LINK at 212-273-6182.

Family Support Series for Caregivers of Children with Autism (all ages): Support groups for parents and caregivers of people with autism. New groups begin this month. To pre-register and for more information, contact YAI LINK at 212-273-6182. See latest group schedule

Leisure Trax Vacation Program: Free or low cost trips and vacations for Bronx residents 18 or older, living with their families. Trips are open to residents of other boroughs. Contact LINK at 212-273-6182. Application and travel schedule available on the Leisure Trax page

Parents With Special Needs: Accepting referrals for program for parents with developmental disabilities who live with their children in Manhattan, Brooklyn, or Queens. Contact Nafiza Somaipersaud at 212-793-2182, ext. 203.

Manhattan Overnight Respite: 24-hour professional supervision from Friday afternoon until Monday morning for children 5 and older. Must be ambulatory. Contact Vanessa White Germany at 212-255-2673.

Manhattan Holiday Respite – ages 6-18 with DD, live at home with their family. Taking applications for waiting list – contact Tanicqua Davis 212-273-6503

Independent Living Program: Six-month classroom course for Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan residents to develop independent living skills. For application forms, contact Shanique Soto at 212-273-6585.

Brooklyn Children and Adolescent Program: Saturday recreation program for children 6 and older. Contact LINK 212-273-6182.

Brooklyn Leisure Trax: Recreation program for adults 18 and older. Contact LINK212-273-6182.

Brooklyn Saturday Drop Off: Recreation programs Brooklyn residents 16 and older. Contact Cheryl Jones at 718-743-5311.

Brooklyn Autism Social Skills Groups: Accepting applications for program offering structured and supervised opportunities for socialization in an after school setting to children aged 5-12 years old on the autism spectrum residing with their parents in Brooklyn. Contact YAI LINK at 212-273-6182.

Brooklyn Yoga Ballet: 10-week Yoga/Ballet class for girls and boys with autism, between the ages 3-10. For more information, contact LINK at 212-273-6182.

Project Grow: Seven-week behavior management training for parents of children with developmental disabilities, conducted in group settings. Topics include specific behavior techniques to promote positive family interactions. Peer support is provided. Families must reside in Manhattan, Bronx, Staten Island or Queens. Day and evening groups are available in both English and Spanish. Possibility of Cantonese groups. For more information, call 212-273-6259.

Project Grown-Up: Five-week education group for parents of children with developmental disabilities. Basic and advanced parent training covers relationships and sexuality with adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities. Focus on child’s physiological development and interpersonal issues of relationships. Program is available to parents whose children reside with them in Manhattan or Queens. Day and evening groups are available in both English and Spanish. Possibility of Cantonese groups. For more information, call 212-273-6259.

Queens Crisis Intervention Program: In-home behavioral management program for parents available in both English and Spanish.  Parent training groups outside of the home (like project GROW) are also available. Call Lewanda Wallace at 718-793-2182, ext. 221 or Jackie Nunez at 718-793-2182, ext. 231 assistance in Spanish.

Brooklyn Extend-a-Family: Overnight respite provided in the home of a host family. Available for young children who are non-ambulatory. Contact Cheryl Jones at 718-743-5311, ext. 6313.

Bronx In-home respite – In-home respite for children and adults with DD. Contact Tanicqua Davis 212-273-6503.

Queens Saturday Recreation Programs: Activities for individuals 16 and older. Contact Michael VanConant 212-645-1616 x 667

Queens Thank Goodness it’s the Weekend: Socialization group meet twice a month on Fridays for people 16 and older. Contact Michael VanConant 212-645-1616 x 667.

Queens After School Program: After school respite for children 6-15. Contact Stacy Tinglin 718-793-8695 x 210.

Queens In-Home Respite: In-home respite for children with special needs, age 3 and older. Contact Stacy Tinglin 718-793-8695 x 210.

Manhattan STAR Academy

About Manhattan STAR Academy

Manhattan: Accepting inquiries for the Manhattan STAR Academy, a unique learning opportunity for elementary school children. Contact Rae Eisdorfer at 212-420-0510 for information, application and tuition.

Premier HealthCare

About Premier HealthCare

Manhattan: Openings for internal medicine, pediatrics, dental, gynecology, physical therapy, speech therapy, podiatry, neurology (adult), weight management program, and a program for people with physical disabilities.

Bronx: Openings for internal medicine, pediatrics, dental, neurology (adult), podiatry, occupantonial therapy, physical therapy,  prosthetics & orthotics.

Queens: Openings for internal medicine, pediatrics, dental, dental desensitization, podiatry, dermatology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy, physiatry/wheelchair clinic, prosthetics & orthotics, and endocrinology (adult).

Brooklyn: Openings for internal medicine, dental, dental desensitization, pediatrics, dermatology, neurology (adult), gynecology, speech therapy, podiatry, endocrinology (adult), and physiatry/wheelchair clinic.

For new referrals, additional services or information, contact YAI LINK at 1-866-2-YAI-LINK, TDD: 212-290-2787.

Center for Specialty Therapy

About YAI’s Center for Specialty Therapy

Manhattan: Psychosocial evaluations in English and Spanish are available. Contact YAI LINK at 212-273-6182

Queens: Psychosocial evaluations in Enlish and Spanish (includes evening and Saturday hours) are available. Contact YAI LINK at 212-273-6182.

Brooklyn: Psychosocial evaluations in English are available. Contact YAI LINK at 212-273-6182.

Bronx:  Psychosocial evaluations in Elblish and Spanish are available. Contact YAI LINK at 212-273-6182.

Families living in Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn who need evaluations to access OPWDD services but who do not have insurance that will cover them can contact YAI LINK at 212-273-6182.

Day Services

About YAI’s Day Services

Manhattan: Openings in Manhattan programs. Contact Domingo Hernandez at 212-645-1616 ext. 634.

Employment Services

About YAI’s Employment Services

Manhattan Employment Services: Training in job-specific skills for adults with developmental disabilities. Openings in a variety of programs. Contact Satera Febus at 212-273-6100, ext. 2448.

Bronx Employment: Accepting applications for a variety of programs. Contact Ruth Jeffers at 718-792-6221, ext. 205.

Brooklyn Supported Work and Training: Accepting applications. Contact Sara Schacter Erenburg at 718-368-9311.

Queens Supported Work and Training Accepting applications. Contact Chris Bechler at 718-389-1300 x227.

There are openings citywide for people with developmental disabilities who are employed and need follow-along support services.

Change.org Petition: Hospital to my autistic son – No heart for you

Thanks, Jhanin, for sharing this with me.

Change.org
My son will die without a heart transplant, but the hospital says he can’t have one — because he’s autistic.
Sign My Petition

My son, Paul, will die without a heart transplant. But the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania refuses to put him on the transplant list — because he’s autistic.

Paul is only 23, and he’s amazing. He was diagnosed with a deadly heart condition four years ago, but he battles through it with a smile. He’s smart and creative — we just self-published a story he wrote, and he’s working on a sequel. He loves his nephews. And the whole family loves him.

I don’t know how to tell my son that his doctors refuse to give him the operation that could save his life.

I promised Paul that I would fight for him with every breath, no matter what it takes. But I’m afraid my voice alone isn’t enough. I started a petition on Change.org asking the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to put my son on the transplant list — will you sign?

Paul’s doctor says one of the reasons he doesn’t qualify for a transplant is that he can’t name all the medications he’s on. This is ridiculous, because Paul takes 19 medications. My son has faced discrimination because of his autism all his life, but this time, that discrimination could kill him.

I was devastated when I found out the hospital wouldn’t help Paul — it was the worst moment any mother could imagine. But then I read about another mom who got her mentally disabled daughter on the list for a life-saving kidney transplant after more than 50,000 people signed her petition on Change.org. That’s what inspired me to start my petition for Paul. I know that if enough people sign my petition, the hospital will give my son a chance to survive.

Please sign my petition asking the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to put my son, Paul, on the list for a heart transplant that could save his life.

Thank you,

Karen Corby

Top Ten: Toxins Most Likely To Cause Autism And Learning Disabilities

Apparently this article came out in April of this year. Good thing we buy BPA free products at home, but not sure how to avoid “automotive exhaust” in NYC…

Top 10 Chemicals Most Likely to Cause Autism and Learning Disabilities

by 

Mount Sinai Children’s Environmental Health Center (CEHC) released a list of the top ten toxic chemicals suspected to cause autism and learning disabilities.

Recently, the CDC reported that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) now affects 1 of every 88 American children – a 23% increase from 2006 and a 78% increase from 2002.

And while there is controversy over how those numbers are reached, it still is worth repeating.  There has been a 78% increase in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder in the last ten years.  At the same time, the CDC also reported that ADHD now affects 14% of American children.

As these disorders continue to affect more children across the U.S., researchers are asking what is causing these dramatic increases.  Some of the explanation is greater awareness and more accurate diagnosis. But clearly, there is more to the story than simply genetics, as the increases are far too rapid to be of purely genetic origin.

According to the Mount Sinai Children’s Environmental Health Center (CEHC) release and data from the research article, “Environmental Pollutants and Disease in American Children (July 2002), “the National Academy of Sciences reports that 3% of all neurobehavioral disorders in children are caused directly by toxic exposure in the environment and another 25% disorders are caused by interactions between environmental factors and genetics. But the precise environmental causes are not yet known”. (Note: the first version of this article included a link to the National Academy of Sciences study from 2000 and has been updated to include a link to the July 2002 study).

So while industry can claim that there is little evidence that these chemicals in isolation or in combination (which doctors now refer to as “synergistic toxicity”) cause autism, the truth is that there is still very little evidence or the toxicological safety studies.  In other words, there is a gap in the science.

There is a huge gap.  According to CNN, the EPA has tested only about 200 of the 80,000 chemicals in use.

But thankfully, that is changing with the work of the team at Mt. Sinai and the extraordinary leadership, courage and intellect of Dr. Phil Landrigan and the urgent call by experts to reform chemical laws.

To guide a research strategy to discover potentially preventable environmental causes and to arm parents and those hoping to be parents with knowledge, the Children’s Environmental Health Center (CEHC) has developed a list of ten chemicals found in consumer products that are suspected to contribute to autism and learning disabilities.

This list was published today in Environmental Health Perspectives in an editorial written by Dr. Philip J. Landrigan, director of the CEHC, Dr. Linda Birnbaum, director of the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), and Dr. Luca Lambertini, also of the CEHC.

You can see the Top 10 chemicals as well as the rest of this article by clicking here.

 

New on childmind.org: Customizing games for your kids, spanking and mental illness, coming of age on medication

THIS WEEK ON CHILDMIND.ORG
July 3, 2012
I’m pleased to tell you about a rather delightful piece on childmind.org (just in time for summer vacation) about games—how to make them work for children of different ages and abilities. It’s delightful because the writer, Michaela Searfoorce, brings such insight and humor to the role of being a mother of three kids. A passionate game-player, Michaela has customized five popular games for her brood, which includes, as she puts it, “a special needs pre-teen, a competitive 3-year-old and a copycat 20-month-old. What’s the secret? We make up our own rules.”What makes her reinvented games irresistible is her acuity in creating fun and engaging experiences for kids. My particular favorite is what she calls “Trivial Pursuit – Dinnertime Edition,” in which she writes questions on cards for each child and deploys them to energize dragging dinner table talk. “This little game has saved many a dinner alone with the kids while Ryan works late and I am out of ideas. The cards make it an ‘official game’ so they will answer anything I ask—pretty genius, right?”——

If you haven’t read her blog, thefoorce.com, I recommend that you check it out. I’m hooked on her weekly installments of conversations with James, her 11-year-old son with multiple disabilities. James is unpredictable, imaginative, perceptive, and occasionally infuriating. In one recent post from the Long Island Rail Road, his little sister points out a train yard and asks him what it is.  “It’s kind of like a nursing home for trains,” says James. “When trains stop working or when they get old they go to train yards.” Here’s another one in which Michaela captures the humor in James’s bad mood on a very rocky morning—something we all need to do on those kind of days.

 —Caroline Miller, Editorial Director

Don’t Miss Tomorrow’s Meeting – What Better Way To Start A Friday Than With Some Relaxation?

I hope you are able to join me for what should be a fantastic meeting about alternative medicine and a yoga relaxation session tomorrow, February 3rd! For more details click here.

Special Needs Events Around NYC – February 2012

And I thought there was a lot to choose from in January! Though this collection is only a small sliver of what is being offered around NYC in February, I hope to see you at many of the unique events and opportunities listed below:

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February 3, 2012 (click the link below)

Next meeting of The Foorce at PS 163 – do not miss this special event – it’s FREE (and awesome)!

Alternative Medicine Approaches for Special Needs and Yoga Relaxation Session

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Achilles Kids Super Bowl Fun Run
Saturday, February 4th
JCC: 334 Amsterdam @ 76th Street
9:30 am – 12 noon
 
Are you ready to rumble???  Wear your NY Giants Blue or YOUR team colors and come ready to run down the “field” and score a touchdown!
——
Achilles Kids February Fun Run
Saturday, February 25th
JCC: 334 Amsterdam @ 76th Street
9:30 am – 12 noon
 
February sure is a busy month! Groundhog Day, Valentine’s Day, President’s Day…. We’re going to pack a ton of holiday celebrations into one mega event! Join us!
For more information, please call 212.354.0300

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Reelabilities – February 9-14, 2012

NY Disabilities Film Festival is the largest festival in the country dedicated to promoting awareness and appreciation of the lives, stories and artistic expressions of people with different disabilities. Initiated in NY in 2007, the festival presents award winning films by and about people with disabilities in multiple locations throughout each hosting city. Post-screening discussions and other engaging programs bring together the community to explore, discuss, embrace, and celebrate the diversity of our shared human experience.

Reelabilities Festival – click here for details!

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YAI Autism Family Support Services

2/16, 2/23 and 3/1 from 10am-12pm

3 session series on yoga and relaxation

  • Pre-registration is required by calling YAI LINK at 212-273-6182.
  • Parents and caregivers only! No children please.
  • Location: 460 West 34th Street, 11th floor, New York, NY 10001
  • Structure: 1st half (Presentation), 2nd half (Support)
  • Fee: None!

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How to protect your adult child legally and financially
Thursday, February 16 7-9:00PM
JCC Manhattan
Join Andrew Cohen, Esq. and Mitch Weisbrot, CLU for an informative seminar that addresses the legal and financial preparations crucial to safeguarding assets, benefits and rights for your special needs child. Andrew and Mitch are fathers of children with disabilities. Their personal experience and professional expertise enable them to help other parents navigate the confusing and emotional aspects of estate planning to best serve the interests of each special needs individual. Topics of Discussion: • Government benefits for persons with disabilities • Estate planning and special needs trusts • Guardianship – why it’s important to establish this duty and authority • Transitioning to the workforce or a day habilitation program • Housing options • Legal quandaries – contracts, credit cards, crime, etc. • Marriage and children
$20.00 Member
$25.00 Nonmember
FSALEG00W2

For more information, or to register, please call 646-505-5708.

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Tech Kids Unlimited: A Mini-Tech Workshop for Kids with Special Needs 
Ages 8-15
Explore the magical world of I-stop animation. Students will work with an artist-in-residence specializing in digital animation to develop their own storyboards, shoot their work and create their own animations. If your child has previously taken this workshop, he or she will work on more advanced animations.

Wed, Feb 22, 2-6 pm
Thu, Feb 23, 3-6 pm
Fri, Feb 24, 11 am-2 pm
$245/$255

For more information or to register, please contact

Beth Rosenberg at brosenberg@jccmanhattan.org.

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AMC SFF Films – February 25, 10:00AM – Journey 2: The Mysterious Island

Go to http://www.amctheatres.com/sff/ to find a participating theater near you.


Don’t Miss This Meeting Just Because My Title Isn’t Snazzy!! “Alternative Medicine Approaches for Special Needs and FREE Yoga Relaxation Session” is on February 3rd

If your loved one has special needs, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, ADD/ADHD, or Sensory Integration Issues, I truly hope you will be able to join me at the next meeting of The Foorce (details below).

I’m really looking forward to this meeting on many levels; 1) I have a medicated child who has been diagnosed with ADD, Sensory Integration Dysfunction and PDD-NOS (among many other things) 2) yoga is something I know very little about, 3) alternative medicine is something I am even less familiar with and 4) if there are safe, natural ways aside from medications that might help my disabled child (and my wallet) I am all ears!

We have two very special presenters who will discuss the various approaches within alternative medicine (diet, homeopathy, acupuncture) and conclude with a relaxing yoga session so that you can bring home some peace of mind. They are generously taking time out of their incredibly busy schedules, so please forward this info to anyone who might be interested in attending this event – I’d love to have a good turnout for their trouble.

Hope to see you there!

You are invited to a

Special Needs Café 163 event

Alternative Medicine Approaches for Special Needs

and

FREE Yoga Relaxation Session

 

 

More About The Featured Presenters:

Aaron Teich, L.Ac., Co-Founder and Director of Shuniya Health & Healing

Aaron has been involved in holistic health and healing for over a decade. After completing his undergraduate studies in Comparative Religion and Philosophy at Harvard University, he attended the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco. This year-round, four-year program involved comprehensive training in all aspects of Chinese Medicine, including acupuncture, herbal medicine, nutrition, Asian body therapy, and Qigong. Aaron is a Licensed Acupuncturist in the States of New York and California and is nationally certified as a Diplomate of Oriental Medicine (Dipl.OM).

In addition to his background in Chinese Medicine, Aaron is also a certified Kundalini yoga teacher and Sat Nam Rasayan healer, and he received his certificate in Visionary Craniosacral Work from the Milne Institute in Berkeley,California. In 2009, he and his wife spent a year traveling around the world interviewing and studying with traditional healers from eleven different countries. Aaron writes and lectures on topics of holistic health and healing, leads workshops and retreats on healing and meditation, and maintains a private practice inNew York City.

Aaron will present various approaches within complementary and alternative medicine (e.g. working with food and diet, acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy, etc.) and how they are applicable to children with special needs. Following the presentation there will be time for questions and discussion. For more information about Aaron Teich please go to http://www.shuniyahealing.com.

 

Laura Mitchell, LMSW, Supervisor of YAI LINK

Laura is a certified Kripalu Yoga Instructor and Licensed Massage Therapist. She works in YAI’s LINK department doing information and referral, outreach and presentations to families and professionals on OPWDD eligibility. In her “spare” time she also runs social skills groups for children on the autism spectrum and manages contracts for family support funded evalutions. She will be leading a yoga session that teaches relaxation techniques to parents, with take home tips for your children.

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Location: PS 163, 163 W. 97th Street, auditorium

Date: February 3, 2012

 Time: 9:00am

 

Please wear comfortable clothing and feel free to bring a yoga mat or blanket!

 

For more information please contact

Michaela Searfoorce at msearfoorce@gmail.com